Teaching

  • Present Courses Taught
    • Modern Economics A (Microeconomics)
           This course provides 1st-year students of the School of Business Administration with the basic knowledge of microeconomics that is necessary to understand the theory and practice of business administration. Microeconomics analyzes how the price mechanism leads the individual behavior of households and firms (referring to market prices) to the equilibrium of demand and supply in the market and to the efficient allocation of scarce resources as well as assesses the resultant welfare. On this course, we especially study the following factors that have close relations with business management: consumers’ utility, firms’ profits and cost structures, and competition in the market. Market failure is also explained.
       
    • Modern Economics B (Macroeconomics)
           This course provides 1st-year students of the School of Business Administration with the basic knowledge of macroeconomics that is necessary to understand the theory and practice of business administration. Macroeconomics analyzes the economic situation of a whole country, based on the relationship between economic variables such as production, income, consumption, government expenditure, investment, exports and imports, money stock, interest rates, price levels, and unemployment. On this course, we especially study the following factors that have close relations with business management: the circular flow of the economy, Say’s law and the principle of effective demand, and fiscal and monetary policy by the government. The limitations of economic policies are also explained.
       
    • Business Economics A *from 2018
           This course provides students of the School of Business Administration who will engage in for-profit or non-profit management practices with knowledge of economics that will serve for understanding actual economic trends and managerial decision making. A is a “micro part” that aims to apply knowledge of microeconomics to understanding the actual market structure and behavior of economic agents. In classes, we confirm the theoretical framework to grasp the overall picture of the market, and then visualize and study the market structure and behaviors of consumers and corporations using various graphs.
       
    • Business Economics B *from 2018
           This course provides students of the School of Business Administration who will engage in for-profit or non-profit management practices with knowledge of economics that will serve for understanding actual economic trends and managerial decision making. B is a “macro part” that aims to apply knowledge of macroeconomics to understanding the actual trends of Japanese economy. In classes, we confirm the theoretical framework to grasp the overall picture of the macroeconomy, and then visualize and study the aspects of Japanese economy using various indicators.
       
    • Fundamental Specialized Seminar A (Theme: Microeconomics) *from 2017
           Microeconomics as a discipline starts with consumers and producers who refer to market prices and then studies the mechanism by which demand and supply attain equilibrium and scarce resources are allocated efficiently. The discipline is thought to be an essential body of knowledge in the fields of economics and business; it is, in fact, a global standard. In this seminar, to acquire basic knowledge that can be applied to societies globally, we study microeconomics using the literature written in English.
       
    • Seminar I, IIA, IIB, IIIA, IIIB (Theme: Economics of Markets and Organizations)
           This seminar chooses the “Economics of Markets and Organization” as its topic and provides students of the School of Business Administration with a place to study and discuss economics together. Students systematically study the approach of new institutional economics, which has a close relation with business administration as a discipline, while they can choose their own topic for their individual study and graduation thesis that relates to economic theories, thoughts, or affairs. In this seminar, which spans two and a half years from the autumn semester in the second year to graduation, students are taught to develop their abilities to think and express ideas and to find and solve problems by themselves.

  • Past Courses Taught
    • Japanese Economy *until 2017
    • Liberal Arts Seminar A (Theme: Introduction to Economic Thought) *until 2017
    • Liberal Arts Seminar A (Theme: Introduction to Economics) *until 2016
    • Liberal Arts Seminar A (Theme: Morality of the Market) *until 2014

*This webpage only shows the course outlines, not the official syllabi. Prospective students of the courses should also refer to the official syllabi.